Rebecca Stover cuts into the metal that will be turned into a weight for practice for the highland games in the summer. Stover battled thyroid cancer for two years and during that period of her life creating work was near impossible. "I would just come into the shop and stand here for hours, sometimes I would try to make things but it never worked out," Stover said. "Now that I am in recovery I have more energy to create." Stover is currently in recovery from cancer, and hopes to be cleared and cancer free by May. Since her recovery she is back to spending four hours everyday in the shop.
       
     
 A wall decorated with items collected over the years, with a personal note to self at Stover's home metal shop where she creates her work.
       
     
 Stover marks a piece of metal she will use as a weight for the highland games that will take place in Edgewood. She plans on using the weight for practice for the weight over bar event.
       
     
 Stover looks through piles of metal and copper that have been given to her by friends and family over the years, which are used to create her pieces. Stover began metal work while at CNM years ago, where she received a certificate in welding and has “been hooked ever since.”  Her inspiration derives from many different places. Lately her work has been inspired by pre-columbian art from Mexico.
       
     
 A bird sculpture created by Stover stands near the entrance of the metal shop. The piece was created out of butter knives. Stover finds fulfillment in knowing her pieces are going to outlast her, "it’ll be the thing that I leave behind, it's ephemeral, it can't be destroyed. It would take a lot to destroy my art,” she said.
       
     
 Stover welds a piece of metal at her home studio on Feb. 21. "It was horrible to not be able to do this, (metal work), I'm very athletic and I'm very involved in this (metal work), so not being able to do this you basically lose who you are. So to go back to the gym and come back in here has been regaining who I am," she said.
       
     
 Rebecca Stover cuts into the metal that will be turned into a weight for practice for the highland games in the summer. Stover battled thyroid cancer for two years and during that period of her life creating work was near impossible. "I would just come into the shop and stand here for hours, sometimes I would try to make things but it never worked out," Stover said. "Now that I am in recovery I have more energy to create." Stover is currently in recovery from cancer, and hopes to be cleared and cancer free by May. Since her recovery she is back to spending four hours everyday in the shop.
       
     

Rebecca Stover cuts into the metal that will be turned into a weight for practice for the highland games in the summer. Stover battled thyroid cancer for two years and during that period of her life creating work was near impossible. "I would just come into the shop and stand here for hours, sometimes I would try to make things but it never worked out," Stover said. "Now that I am in recovery I have more energy to create." Stover is currently in recovery from cancer, and hopes to be cleared and cancer free by May. Since her recovery she is back to spending four hours everyday in the shop.

 A wall decorated with items collected over the years, with a personal note to self at Stover's home metal shop where she creates her work.
       
     

A wall decorated with items collected over the years, with a personal note to self at Stover's home metal shop where she creates her work.

 Stover marks a piece of metal she will use as a weight for the highland games that will take place in Edgewood. She plans on using the weight for practice for the weight over bar event.
       
     

Stover marks a piece of metal she will use as a weight for the highland games that will take place in Edgewood. She plans on using the weight for practice for the weight over bar event.

 Stover looks through piles of metal and copper that have been given to her by friends and family over the years, which are used to create her pieces. Stover began metal work while at CNM years ago, where she received a certificate in welding and has “been hooked ever since.”  Her inspiration derives from many different places. Lately her work has been inspired by pre-columbian art from Mexico.
       
     

Stover looks through piles of metal and copper that have been given to her by friends and family over the years, which are used to create her pieces. Stover began metal work while at CNM years ago, where she received a certificate in welding and has “been hooked ever since.” Her inspiration derives from many different places. Lately her work has been inspired by pre-columbian art from Mexico.

 A bird sculpture created by Stover stands near the entrance of the metal shop. The piece was created out of butter knives. Stover finds fulfillment in knowing her pieces are going to outlast her, "it’ll be the thing that I leave behind, it's ephemeral, it can't be destroyed. It would take a lot to destroy my art,” she said.
       
     

A bird sculpture created by Stover stands near the entrance of the metal shop. The piece was created out of butter knives. Stover finds fulfillment in knowing her pieces are going to outlast her, "it’ll be the thing that I leave behind, it's ephemeral, it can't be destroyed. It would take a lot to destroy my art,” she said.

 Stover welds a piece of metal at her home studio on Feb. 21. "It was horrible to not be able to do this, (metal work), I'm very athletic and I'm very involved in this (metal work), so not being able to do this you basically lose who you are. So to go back to the gym and come back in here has been regaining who I am," she said.
       
     

Stover welds a piece of metal at her home studio on Feb. 21. "It was horrible to not be able to do this, (metal work), I'm very athletic and I'm very involved in this (metal work), so not being able to do this you basically lose who you are. So to go back to the gym and come back in here has been regaining who I am," she said.